Preparing for a deposition

 

In simple terms, a deposition is when the verbal statement of a witness is taken under oath. Usually during a deposition the attorney will ask questions and the person providing the deposition will answer the question.

Deposition Tips

 
  • Be prepared to answer any questions.
  • If you do not remember or don’t know the answer, say so.
  • You must always tell the truth.
  • Make sure to fully understand each question before answering.
  • Keep your emotions inside, don’t get upset or disturbed.
  • It would be in your best interested to never take guesses.
  • Maintain professionalism while in the court room.
  • Don’t joke or discuss anything with the opposing attorneys outside of the deposition.
  • Be cautious answering questions that follow an objection.
  • Help out the court reporter, try to wait for the question to be finished before you start to answer.
  • Answer with a clear yes or no. You do not want to say “uh-huh”.
  • Read over the documents before testifying about them. If you’re asked to answer questions then you’re going to want to understand those documents.
 
A deposition is really part of the discovery in a lawsuit. It is the taking of sworn testimony by a potential witness in a trial. Most of the questions will not be admissible during a trial, but you do have to answer. Being professional is important when talking about deposition. You want to be taken serious and able to get your point across. The attorney that will be asking you questions will be watching your demeanor. Attorneys are permitted to question the witnesses about many things and subjects during these depositions. A common tactic that the opposing attorney may try to pull, is a long silence and or pause. This allows you to think you have to speak more than you actually do. Most depositions take around the two hour mark, but they can also range from one hour to multiple days. If you’d like to learn more on depositions, please call us at (209)-478-3377 or fill out our inquiry form! Thank you.